Software lean manufacturing #lean,six #sigma,streamline #operations,manufacturing,production #processes,lean #kaizen,just #in #time #production,jit,assembly,idle #inventory,kanban,continuous #imporvement,ci,poke #yoke,total #quality


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LEAN Manufacturing for Enterprise Wide Operational Excellence

Reduce process cycle times by more than 10%

Enterprise Wide Continuous Improvement Operational Excellence

Lean Manufacturing practices have generally been adopted since the early 70’s, and has become a vital part of Continuous Improvement and Manufacturing Excellence. Continuous Improvement (CI) techniques such as 5S, Poka Yoke, SMED, and TPM are all major elements of achieving Lean practices across individual and multiple sites.
CI is at the heart of any LEAN initiative and so having an empowered CI team in place from inception is key in driving the process forward. The role of the team is to facilitate buy-in from Operators and Stakeholders so that everybody understands what impact they have in the improvement process and believe the potential value of the program, both departmentally and company-wide. Evolving an improvement culture and strategy across the whole organisation is vital to a successful CI program.

Other Lean Tools to be implemented as part of your Lean System

Six Sigma

Six Sigma describes quantitatively how a process is performing. It measures defects per million opportunities (DPMO) and a defect is defined as anything outside of customer specifications. The opportunity is then the total quantity of chances for a defect.
The fundamental objective of the methodology is the implementation of a measurement-based strategy that focuses on process improvement and variation reduction through the application of Six Sigma. The use of DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve and Control) is an improvement system for existing processes falling below specification and looking for incremental improvement. Six Sigma processes are executed by Six Sigma Green Belts and Six Sigma Black Belts, and are overseen by Six Sigma Master Black Belts.

Just in time Production

JIT is a pull based system based on buying enough materials to fit into production and ensuring an even flow of materials, which results in holding less stock. Having the correct amount of materials in line with a production plan will reduce in process inventory and associated costs. Raw materials will arrive on schedule and in the planned order and amounts to go into production. An effective inventory management system is essential to improving and supporting a JIT supply model.
JIT manufacturing includes bringing together sequences such as fabrication, sub assembly, inventory, supplier, final assembly and shipping to quicken turnover, eliminate idle inventory, reduce waste, reduce money tied up in inventory, and increase efficiency to raise productivity. JIT is dependent on signals or Kanban’s, which tells production when to make the next part. JIT operations is a great way to improve inventory accuracy and achieve a better more lean material flow for greater inventory management control. JIT compliments continuous improvement and lean manufacturing by having the right materials, at the right place, and in the right amounts.

Kanban

Kanban is a Pull System which enables Production to request material at the time of use. As parts are consumed within the manufacturing process, the Kanban signal triggers the delivery, both internally and externally* to the Point of Use/Fit (POU/POF). This is a supporting function to a sequencing operation which eliminates the need for multiple parts at the POF, thus reducing shop-floor inventory.
One of the main benefits of Kanban is to establish an upper limit to the work in progress inventory, as part of the ‘pull’ demand approach, inventory stock levels are also managed better and usually have smaller, faster turnarounds. Electronic, paperless Kanban systems eliminate manual entry errors and enable real-time demand signalling using a mix of technology, such as barcode scanners, to trigger materials within the production process.
A typical Kanban system marks inventory with barcodes which workers scan at different stages of the process, signalling usage. The scan sends a message to internal stores to ensure restocking of the item. Having a real-time view of inventory throughout the supply chain can significantly improve and support Lean Manufacturing processes.

Poka Yoke

‘Poka Yoke’ is a Japanese term meaning ‘fail-safeing’ or ‘error proofing’. These systems detect and prevent process errors for improved quality control and can be implemented in a manufacturing process to help an operator avoid mistakes caused by choosing the wrong part. The purpose is to eliminate product defects by preventing, correcting or drawing attention to both human and mechanical errors as they occur.
There are two types of Poka Yoke systems: the Prevention (control approach) which guides the operator through a process and determines whether the correct process is being followed and prevents a defect from occurring, and the Detection (warning approach) that catches a defect which has already occurred before the goods are shipped to the customer. Devices are used to identify product defects by testing criteria such as the product’s shape, size, or colour. If the product doesn’t comply, a warning will be signalled. Poka Yoke technologies can include; electronic check-lists, locating pins, error alarm detection, physical contact sensors – photocell, touch switches, energy sensors – photoelectric switch, proximity switch, beam sensors, warning sensors – lights, colour code, timers, detectors, readers, meters, and counters.
Poka Yoke systems have many benefits when implemented into Continuous Improvement and Lean Manufacturing strategies resulting in enhanced and controlled processes; leading to reduced rework, scrap and warranty costs, reduction of waste for improved waste management, achieving ZDQ (Zero Defect Quality) which reduces the associated costs with manufacturing defects, improves quality for sustained customer satisfaction, loyalty and retention, and achieving 100% compliance, zero defects, zero waste, zero delays to reduce overall manufacturing costs and improve productivity.

For further information about implementing LEAN manufacturing practices please call us on 01274 599955 or email us here

Resources

  • APS Group Case Study (Parsec)
  • Royal Mail Case Study
  • LEAN Manufacturing Whitepaper
  • Quality Management Video
  • Minimising the Six Big losses Webinar
  • 7 Best Practices of Highly Effective Teams Whitepaper
  • Real-Time WCM Whitepaper
  • Nine Habits of Continuous Improvement Teams Whitepaper
  • Lean Management Journal Article Logical Lean Dec 2010 Steve Wilkinson
  • Lean Management Journal Article Oct 2011 Lean with IT Mike Hodge
  • Lean Management Journal Jan 2012 Lean on IT, APS Steve Goodall
  • Lean Management Journal Aug 2012 A View from the Shop Floor Wrigley
  • Lean Management Journal Sept 2013 Making IT Work Chris Borrowdale
  • The Manufacturer- Apr 15 Lean manufacturing in the UK BLOG
  • The Manufacturer- Apr 15 New webinar to help mfgs get lean
  • More Downloads

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RT to RN Transition, not so easy! #head #start, #registered, #total #care, #that, #respiratory, #nursing,


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RT to RN Transition, not so easy!

Absolutely, positively, do not give up on your goal of becoming a Registered Nurse. You have wonderful healthcare experience, and you will be a terrific nurse. While you may feel being an RT goes unrecognized by schools, there is no denying your 8 years of patient care – which will serve you well -and has nothing to do with a GPA – patients don’t care, they just want you on their side. Plus your GPA is fine, it’s average. Your drive, your compassion, and your healthcare knowledge will ultimately outweigh any obstacles you now face. Are you saying that your current university offers an accelerated nursing degree in one year, after June 2009 when you get a bs degree, and are you guaranteed a position into this program? Feel free to [PM] – I can help you figure this out. I am a master’s prepared nurse.

By the way, my husband went through the same thing. He is now an Internal Medicine doctor. He was born to be one, and he knew it. He was turned down by many medical schools, who said his GPA isn’t good enough, and his MCAT (the test you have to take for med school) scores were horrible. He impressed the Dean at Columbia Med School with his drive. He got in, and failed his first year there, because he isn’t good at hard science, plus he is color blind, so he couldn’t get through the slide portion of histology, etc. He got through the second time. I am talking Ivy League education all along – undergrad and graduate. He is now the top producer in a large medical practice. And his patients have access to his cell phone, 24/7. 5,000 patients. They call only when absolutely necessary, which isn’t often. He takes such good care of them that most of them do not need to call him. He has had patients for 25+ years, and he goes to each and every funeral or calling hours. Does this have anything to do with GPA? No. And it doesn’t mean anything for you, too.

If you want it, go for it. Please do [PM] me!

Last edit by SteveNNP on Aug 9, ’08. Reason. email address deleted per site TOS

I feel that my role of a therapist is somewhat significant.

Why would you say somewhat .

Let me ask, what kind of respiratory program did you attend that kept you enrolled with a GPA 3.0? Secondly, what sort of facility only expects ventilatory support from the RT’s? Do you work in a teaching hospital? If so, perhaps a job with more clinical responsibility would be a better fit.

Although I have not gone to NS, I work with 2 RN’s that were previously RRT’s and a good friend from respiratory school is currently in NS. They all felt very well prepared and transitioned fairly smoothly. One is a manager on our med-surge unit (I think he’s nuts!) The other ICU nurse has been accepted to anethesia school, she said the interviewer was quite excited by her respiratory experience. And my friend wants to become a transplant coordinater. Either way, holding dual credentials is an asset.

Typically core curriculum credits will rarely transfer to another program. For example; a nurse going to respiratory school would not be able to transfer the core nursing credits. But if you were going to get a BSRC your resp. credits would count. Good Luck!

Hello. I am a Respiratory Therapist turned Registered Nurse. I was a therapist for 12 yrs when I became RN. You can do it don’t give it. And if all else fails you can alway do Excelsior the online nursing program that you can do if you are RT. Look them up. I went to a university. I think hospital experience as a RT is very helpful when becoming a nurse. I work in CCU, and I am a good resource for that unit. Nursing does have alot more responsibility than resp, however in the long run I think you will find it more fullfilling. Nursing has so many opportunities unlike resp. SO. I say don’t give up!

I say somewhat because as part of the critical care team, MDs and RN make decisions based on their assessments alone without my input.

Are you serious. That sounds like a terrible place to work, I assure you it’s not like that everywhere. How does this happen? Why would your director stand for this?

PageRespiratory, I do work in a teaching hospital. I’d like more autonomy which is why I chose nursing. Also with nuring there are many different ways to practice, my goal is to become an advanced level practitioner.

I worked in a huge (1200 bed) teaching facility outside NYC, and it was difficult to draw a gas let alone intubate a Pt. but the ICU residents relied heavily on us (according to them anyway) for Pt. assesment and vent/pulmonary support. While it was difficult to perform a clinical task (outside of a circuit change LOL!), we had a great working relationship with many of the docs. You must be very frustrated working in a limited capacity like that, I would be as well thats for sure. NS sounds like a great option on your way to accomplishing your goal. Have you considered PA school as an alternative?

Last edit by PageRespiratory! on Aug 10, ’08. Reason. Chronic finger – brain asynchrony.

PagingRespiratory, you don’t know how frustrated, I get when the Dr. talks directly to the RN about weaning, vent settings, blood gases ect. and I’m standing right there. When I graduate in June I plan on applying for both the accelerated Masters Entry Nursing and PA school. I heard PA school is extremely competative, more so than nursing. PA school would be nice because I would definitely have the autonomy that I so desire and I will only have to go to school for an additional 2 years instead of 3 for advanced nurse practitioner. Any insight or additional ideas are certainly appreciated. Thanks, PagRespiratory!

I know this post is almost a year old, but I have to ask, where did you find an accelerated nursing program that can be completed in one calender year?

Are you serious. That sounds like a terrible place to work, I assure you it’s not like that everywhere. How does this happen? Why would your director stand for this?

I worked in a huge (1200 bed) teaching facility outside NYC, and it was difficult to draw a gas let alone intubate a Pt. but the ICU residents relied heavily on us (according to them anyway) for Pt. assesment and vent/pulmonary support. While it was difficult to perform a clinical task (outside of a circuit change LOL!), we had a great working relationship with many of the docs. You must be very frustrated working in a limited capacity like that, I would be as well thats for sure. NS sounds like a great option on your way to accomplishing your goal. Have you considered PA school as an alternative?

*Sanchez RRT* Isn’t PA a Masters in Nursing? Are you saying that Ventgurl should continue her edu?