Can I Claim Benefit, Can I Claim Benefit, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council, what benefits can i


Can I Claim Benefit?

You can make a claim for Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction if:

  • You pay rent to a private landlord, housing association, or a council property. But you cannot claim Housing Benefit if you rent from close relatives or the landlord also lives in the same property. A close relative is a parent/step parent or sibling/step sibling. However, if the relative has a commercial tenancy agreement (ie they are a landlord who has let properties previously) then you may be able to claim
  • You have to pay Council Tax on your home. But if you live in a property that is band E or higher you will only be paid up to the amount for a band D property
  • Your savings are less than 16,000 for Housing Benefit and 6000 for Council Tax Reduction applications
  • You work full time or part time (employed or self-employed) and get a low wage
  • You get Benefit or Tax Credit managed by the Department for Work and Pensions, the Inland Revenue or any other low income.

The rules on claiming Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction for self-employed people, students, people from abroad and people who have savings are different to those who get Benefit or Pensions.

There are also different rules for people who have adult children or adults who are not boarders/lodgers or joint tenants. You can find more information on all of the above situations in our related downloads.

How Much Benefit Could I Get?

This is based on the amount of income and savings you have. The more you have the less you get. When we work out your Benefit we take into account:

  • How much money you have coming in each week

Working age – there will be a cap on the amount of benefits that you can get. The Benefit Cap forms part of the Welfare Reform Changes that came into force from April 2013. There are a number of benefits that are included in the Benefit Cap as well as a number of benefits and circumstances that will exclude you from having the cap applied. The Benefit Cap factsheet in Related downloads can explain this further.

If you are not excluded from the benefit amount cap, it will be set at:

  • 500 per week for couples and lone parents; or
  • 350 per week for single adults.
  • How much you have in savings and investments
  • Who lives in your household and their circumstances
  • How much rent and Council Tax you have to pay
  • Whether you are of pension age or working age
  • How many rooms you need for your household (Housing Benefit only).

Renting from South Essex Homes or Housing Associations

Working age – the amount that you are awarded for Housing Benefit depends on the number of rooms you are allowed for your family circumstances, this is known as Size Criteria . Size Criteria forms part of the Welfare Reform Changes that came into force from April 2013. If you are considered to have:

  • 1 extra bedroom you will have a 14% reduction on your Housing Benefit
  • 2 or more extra bedrooms you will have a 25% reduction to your Housing Benefit

You will have to make up the difference yourself. There are some groups of people that are excluded from having the size criteria applied to their claim. For further information about these groups of people please see the Size Criteria Factsheet 2014 in Related Downloads.

Renting from a Private Landlord

If you are working age or pension age the amount you get depends on the Local Housing Allowance rate for the size property you are claiming for. The rates and are updated yearly and can be found in the LHA Rates 2017/2018 Poster in Related Downloads.

Payment on Two Homes

Housing Benefit is normally only paid for one home at a time. However, there are some exceptions where the council may consider paying benefit on two homes. These exceptions are:

  • You have moved into rented accommodation due to fear of violence
  • You are a student/trainee, one of a couple and have to live in separate rented accommodation
  • You have a large family and the council has housed you in two properties
  • You have moved to a new home which you have to pay rent for, but still have to pay rent for a period of time on the old property. This is known as unavoidable overlapping liability.

For further information on payment on two homes please read the Payment on Two Homes leaflet in Related Downloads.

Calculating your Entitlement

To find out an accurate assessment of what you could be entitled to please use the Entitled To Benefit Calculator. Not only will it calculate what you are currently entitled to based on your circumstances but it will also calculate whether you will be better off in work and how Universal Credit will affect you once active in the area.


How to Claim Compensation for Whiplash (with Pictures), can i claim compensation.#Can #i #claim #compensation


How to Claim Compensation for Whiplash

Whiplash is the most common form of injury that follows an automobile accident. A whiplash injury refers to severe muscle strains in the neck and shoulder region. However, if you have been inflicted with such an injury due to the negligent driving of someone else, then it is necessary that you claim compensation for whiplash against the negligent driver. A claim will cover your current medical expenses, as well as your future medical treatment.

Steps Edit

Part One of Eight:

Preserving Your Claim for Compensation Edit

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Part Two of Eight:

Documenting Your Injuries Edit

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Part Three of Eight:

Filing a Claim with an Insurance Company Edit

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Part Four of Eight:

Hiring an Attorney Edit

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation

Can i claim compensation


Flight Delayed Due To Bad Weather – Can I Claim, can i claim compensation.#Can #i


Can I Claim Compensation If My Flight Has Been Delayed Due To Bad Weather?

If your flight has been cancelled or delayed as a result of bad weather, then read on. You could be entitled to up to €600 in flight compensation.

Below are some commonly asked questions about flights affected by bad weather.

Can i claim compensation

Get an Instant Decision on Your Flight

It’s simple to use and completely free.

Can i claim compensation

Get an Instant Decision on Your Flight

Get an Instant Decision on Your Flight

Tuesday 3rd October 2017

Can I Claim Flight Delay Compensation for Bad Weather?

Depending on the exact nature of the bad weather, you could be entitled to claim compensation under EU Regulation 261/2004.

Bad weather must be ‘freak’ or ‘wholly exceptional’ for an airline to use it as a defence against paying compensation.

For example, heavy snowfall during a summer in Egypt would be both freakish and wholly exceptional, whereas heavy snowfall during winter in a ski resort would be neither.

Bad weather must also affect the ‘flight in question’ in order for airlines to use it as a defence. If your flight was delayed because of the knock-on effects of a different flight being affected by bad weather, your flight should be claimable.

Try our free flight delay compensation checker and get an instant decision on your flight in less than a minute.

For example, if you are booked to fly from Manchester to Paris, but the airline cancels the flight citing bad weather in Stockholm (where the aircraft was before arriving in Manchester), then you have a claim because your flight hasn’t been affected directly by bad weather.

You can also claim if there is a continuous level of bad weather at an airport. For example, if you book on a flight from London Heathrow to a ski-resort and there is always bad weather at the ski-resort, then it is not an extraordinary circumstance for bad weather to cause a delay or cancellation, because snow is ‘inherent’ at the ski resort.

After all, the airline would have had to take normal weather conditions into account when deciding whether to allow its aircraft to fly into that airport as part of its business plan.

Is Bad Weather an Extraordinary Circumstance?

Bad weather is not always an extraordinary circumstance, despite what an airline might tell you when you try to claim direct from them.

In fact, the only time weather is an extraordinary circumstance is when:

  • The flight in question is directly affected by ‘freak’ or ‘wholly exceptional weather.’
  • Air Traffic Control decides to reduce flow rates due to bad weather. For example, if ATC decides only 20 planes an hour can land as opposed to the usual 45 planes an hour, that would be an extraordinary circumstance.
  • Air Traffic Control decides to delay a flight, and this causes a knock-on effect to flights throughout the day.
  • An airport is closed because of bad weather.

The best advice we give to passengers is to put their details into our flight compensation calculator and we will give you an instant decision.

The best advice we give to passengers is to put their details into our flight delay compensation calculator.

We take weather readings at every airport everywhere in the world at least once an hour, which means we can give you an instant decision. We can check your flight information against our huge database of flight and weather information.

The CAA includes bad weather in its list of extraordinary circumstances but as Her Honour Judge Clarke said in her ruling on bad weather in Evans v Monarch that list is not legally binding and has been proven wrong in court a number of times.

Judge Clarke said: “I give no weight to it [the CAA’s list]. It is not legally binding. It is clear from its long list of deletions and amendments, arising from changes enforced upon it by decided cases, that the Civil Aviation Authority’s view on what should be considered extraordinary circumstances for the purposes of Article 5(3) has often been at odds with that of the courts. I cannot see that it helps me at all.”

In Evans v Monarch, Judge Clarke also made it clear in her ruling that bad weather, such as lightning, that is ‘inherent in the normal exercise of the carrier’s activity’ is not an extraordinary circumstance.

What Are Extraordinary Circumstances?

Flight Delay Regulation allows passengers to claim a fixed amount of compensation according to the length of their delay and flight distance. However, the regulation gives examples of things that may be classed as extraordinary circumstances where the airlines may not have to pay out under EC261/2004.

Extraordinary circumstances are situations that are not inherent in the normal running of an airline. It doesn’t matter whether or not the delay was the airline’s fault

Extraordinary circumstances are instances that are not inherent in the normal exercise of the airline’s activity. Examples include security threats, industrial strikes and acts of terrorism or sabotage.

That means it doesn’t matter that bad weather is not the airline’s fault; it matters whether or not the bad weather is inherent. If weather is not ‘freak’ or ‘wholly exceptional’ like a volcanic ash cloud for example then it is inherent, and cannot be classed as an extraordinary circumstance.

What Weather Conditions Can I Claim Flight Compensation For?

Flight delays caused by meteorological conditions (weather issues) can be eligible for flight compensation if the delay is more than 3 hours and depending on the severity of the weather problems.

Can I Claim for flight delays caused by fog?

Fog is not an uncommon occurrence, particularly in the UK at certain times of year, but when fog is so bad that Air Traffic Control have to limit the number of flights taking off and landing, or the airport is closed, that can be an extraordinary circumstance.

If the fog is at a completely different airport to the one you are arriving to or departing from but delays the plane that was supposed to take you to your destination, then this type of situation could be eligible for compensation.

Can I Claim for flight delays caused by wind or rain?

Other typically wintry conditions in the UK such as high winds or heavy rain shouldn’t usually be sufficient to cause significant delays. However, if the wind is so strong that it makes landing or taking off very difficult for the pilots, then the

Air Traffic Control may decide to limit the number of flights coming in or departing. This could then lead to an extraordinary circumstance and the airline might not have to pay compensation.

If heavy ongoing rain causes floods at the airport, forcing closures or long delays, then this would usually be classed as an extraordinary circumstance as well.

If the airline has told you the delay was a weather-related extraordinary circumstance but you don’t agree the weather was bad enough, then use our flight delay calculator to get a second opinion in seconds.

Can I Claim for flight delays caused by ash clouds?

One of the more famous flight delays in recent years was caused by an Icelandic volcano erupting and sending ash clouds high into the atmosphere. Due to the danger for planes of flying through these clouds, airlines had to ground their fleets until the ash cloud had dispersed.

Delays due to volcanic activity and ash clouds would be considered an extraordinary circumstance and therefore the airline wouldn’t have to pay compensation. They would still need to provide care and assistance, such as overnight accommodation and food and drink.

Can I Claim for flight delays caused by sand storms?

Sandstorms are not a weather condition that affects the UK too often but they can occur in hot arid countries that people in the UK travel to, such as Dubai, or Egypt.

Despite the fact it might not be completely surprising to experience a sandstorm in a desert country, they are not usually commonplace enough to be considered anything other than an extraordinary circumstance (as the law currently stands).

This is unless the sandstorm has not caused the Air Traffic Control to adjust the flow of aircraft from the usual rates and if other flights are landing and departing without problems of course.

Can I Claim for flight delays caused by turbulence?

Anyone who has experienced turbulence knows it can be a little unnerving even when it’s only light turbulence. Caused by the plane flying through air flowing at different speeds (like swirling water at a river’s edge) turbulence can cause the plane to rapidly drop several feet in altitude.

Severe turbulence that forces a pilot to take emergency action and divert the plane is very rare and it is unlikely you will ever experience this or even know of someone it has happened to.

However, severe turbulence causing a pilot to take a diversion or make an emergency landing would be considered an extraordinary circumstance.

How Much Can I Claim?

E.C. Regulation 261/2004 states that passengers are entitled to between €250 and €600 each as a result of a flight delay or cancellation.

The amount of compensation doesn’t depend on the reason for the delay; it instead depends on the distance between the departure and arrival airports.


Why Your Workers – Compensation Claim Could Be Denied, can i claim compensation.#Can #i #claim


Why Your Workers Compensation Claim Could Be Denied

Workers’ compensation insurers deny many legitimate claims, forcing honest and innocent employees to hire a lawyer and go through the workers’ compensation system to enforce their rights. Why do they deny rightful claims? Some of the main reasons why workers’ compensation insurers deny claims are the following:

  • your injury was unwitnessed
  • you didn’t report your injury immediately
  • there is a discrepancy between your accident report and initial medical records
  • your initial medical records indicate the presence of illegal drugs in your system
  • you filed a workers’ compensation claim after you were fired or laid off
  • you refused to give the insurance company a recorded statement or refused to sign medical authorizations.

Your Injury Was Unwitnessed

Workers’ compensation insurers never like unwitnessed injuries. They question the vast majority of unwitnessed accidents. If you get hurt at work and no one saw your accident, there is nothing that you can do about that. But you should certainly make sure to report the injury to your co-workers and to your supervisor immediately, and you should make sure that you tell everyone the exact same thing about how your injury occurred.

You Didn’t Report Your Injury Immediately

Workers’ compensation insurers don’t like cases where the accident doesn’t get reported immediately either. They assume that, if you don’t report the accident immediately, you weren’t really hurt. Moreover, most states’ workers’ compensation laws require you to report work related injuries within a short time period, sometimes in as little as seven days. Don’t wait. If you get hurt at work, and you think that your injury has the slightest chance of causing you to miss any work, report it immediately to a supervisor and fill out an accident report. That will comply with the law and will help your chances of getting benefits as soon as you need them.

There is a Discrepancy Between Your Accident Report and Initial Medical Records

Insurers will often deny workers’ compensation claims if the employee’s statements about how the accident happened are inconsistent. If you tell your supervisor that the accident happened one way, but tell your doctor that the accident happened in a different way, that will hurt your case. Make sure that, when you tell co-workers, supervisors, people in the personnel office, and health care providers about the accident happened, you are consistent.

Your Initial Medical Records Indicate the Presence of Illegal Drugs in Your System

If an employee goes to the emergency room after a work-related accident, and the emergency room records show illegal drugs in the employee’s system, the insurer is almost definitely not going to voluntarily pay workers’ compensation benefits to that employee.

You Filed a Claim After You Were Fired or Laid Off

Sometimes, employees who were legitimately injured at work delay filing a workers’ compensation claim and by the time they get around to filing the claim, they get fired or laid off. Insurers never like workers’ compensation claims that are filed after the employee gets fired or laid off. They almost always assume that the claim is nothing more than a revenge claim. This is another reason not to wait to file a claim if you have a legitimate work related injury. If you get laid off before you file your claim, you are going to have a difficult time convincing the insurer and the workers’ compensation judge that you really did have a work related injury.

You Refused to Give the Insurance Company a Recorded Statement or Refused to Sign Medical Authorizations

Workers’ compensation insurers will often ask injured employees to give a recorded statement describing the accident and the injuries. Unfortunately, that puts the employee in a difficult position. As a general rule, giving a statement will not help an injured employee who does not have a lawyer. Nor is the employee legally required to give the insurer a recorded statement. If the insurer asks for a statement, that is usually a sign that the insurer has a problem with the case. If the employee gives the statement, the insurer is still probably not going to put that employee on workers’ compensation benefits. But if the employee refuses to give the statement, then the adjuster can tell the employee that his/her failure to give the statement prevented the insurer from starting compensation benefits.

Insurers will also generally ask the employee to sign medical authorizations that will allow the insurer to write directly to the employee’s health care providers to get the employee’s medical records and bills. Again, the employee generally has no legal obligation to sign medical authorizations. An injured employee who is filing a workers’ compensation claim does have the obligation to give his/her medical records and bills relating to the work accident to the insurer, but he/she can meet that obligation by simply getting the records on his/her own and sending them to the insurer.

However, insurers don’t like when employees do that. They don’t trust injured employees. Insurers like to get the medical records on their own. That way they can be sure that they get a complete file, not one that has been cherry-picked. The problem with medical authorizations is that sometimes the insurer will invade your privacy and get medical records that do not relate to the work accident.

If the insurer pushes you to sign a medical authorization and you would prefer not to sign one, then you should contact a workers’ compensation attorney immediately, and let him/her deal with the insurer.


How To Survive as a Newly Single Parent – Scary Mommy, what benefits can i


How To Survive as a Newly Single Parent

What benefits can i claim as a single parent

When you get divorced, a lot changes. I admit, that’s an understatement. A whole lot changes. If you have children, forget the new chapter bullshit; you’re in a new book altogether. Wait. Scratch that. You’re in a different library, in a foreign country. The people here don’t speak the same language, the books aren t organized like they were in your old house of literature and you can’t seem to find the damn directory anywhere.

Shit. This single parent thing is legit. Survival requires a skill set you most likely have either: a) lost, b) never used, or c) didn t have in the first place. From things like clogged sinks and lawns needing mowed, to instantly being placed in the dual role of good cop and bad cop, the tasks a single parent handles on a day-to-day basis put an air traffic controller’s job to shame.

Success, however, can be accomplished, I promise. Should a person equip themselves adequately, single parenting can actually be somewhat appealing. Swear to God.

Here are some things you ll need to come out on the other side of solo childrearing with (most of) your mental faculties intact, a smile on your face and only an average amount of therapy bills

1. A babysitter. Preferably one with no social life, so when you call her from your closet floor at 6 p.m. in tears, desperate for some “you time,” she’ll be right there.

2. A back-up babysitter. And at least one more back-up for the back-up. This is serious stuff. Criteria for a quality babysitter ranges widely depending on age and skills of your children. The older they get, the less important things like “speaks English” and “over 16” are.

3. Membership to a wine club. Or a discount liquor store. Or both! You think I’m kidding. I’m not.

4. A single friend of the same gender and near your age range. When you finally get a minute to yourself, have managed to find clothing that is not for work, “exercise” attire, or covered with last night s dinner and this morning’s breakfast, and still have the energy left over to hit the town, you’re going to want a wingman/woman. Choose wisely. Different friends, different crowds. ‘Nuff said.

5. A friend with benefits. There are going to be times when you, uh, would like some um, needs met. Unless you’re down with random hook-ups or have (equally unwisely) jumped back into a committed relationship, you might want to have a person on call with whom to handle this business. Just be careful. Don’t go falling in love and shit. Keep it together. Business is business, people.

6. A great group of supportive friends. Don’t blow it by being the party pooper all the time there, Debbie Downer. They have problems too. Listen and be supportive for them just as often (if not more frequently) than you bring your latest crisis to their attention.

7. Good neighbors. Ones you can look in the face the morning after a night out and who will either politely claim they did not hear you yelling at your children last night around 8 p.m., or, heard it, and were over in within five minutes to play backup.

8. Single parent friends and networks. Don’t know any? Try MeetUp. Seriously. These people will be absolutely essential to your feeling like anything other than a reject of the Members Only Club to which all your married peeps belong.

9. A virtual, cloud-based calendar shared with your ex spouse. Put everything possibly related to the kids and their whereabouts here. You can’t lose it, it’s highly accessible and it’s free. If you set reminders, you can’t forget about appointments (easily) and you can “communicate” with your ex sans contention. Well maybe, so long as you leave the sarcasm out of the comments section. Try hard. It’s possible, so I hear.

10. A sense of humor. Don’t have one? GET ONE. NOW. The only way to make this drama into less of a horror flick and more of an action parody is to be able to laugh, often, at yourself and your situation.

So quit whining already. The credits will be rolling before you know it, take off those pouty pants, get yourself together and hit the road, running. You can do it.


VA taking guesswork out of filing for benefits by requiring forms, what benefits can i


VAntage Point

What benefits can i claim as a single parent

VAntage Point

Official Blog of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VA taking guesswork out of filing for benefits by requiring forms

A new way to file

What benefits can i claim as a single parent

What benefits can i claim as a single parent

A couple years after I separated from the military, a retired chief at my local The American Legion post told me I should look into filing an increase on one of my disabilities. At that time, my disability was causing me increased pain and she was concerned I was not being compensated appropriately.

At first I ignored her, but with more prompting I went onto VA’s website and searched for the form to file an increase on my disability compensation. Finding none, I went back to the chief and she found me a local service officer who wrote on a piece of paper that I wanted to file an increase for my service-connected disability, put it in an envelope, and dropped it in the mail.

I was stunned. For weeks, I had searched for a form that did not exist.

Shortly after that, I started working for a Veterans service organization helping other Veterans appeal their claims. Like the service officer who had helped me, I would advise Veterans to write what they were appealing on a piece of paper and mail it in. Many of them found it confusing.

“What do I write?” they would ask. Or, “There’s really no form?” Or my favorite, “Even the DMV requires me to fill out a form for a driver’s license.”

The confusion Veterans, their families and survivors felt in the claims process was a major reason why I came to work at VA in 2011. I had ideas and wanted to be a part of the change to help Veterans like myself and husband. More importantly, I wanted to communicate those changes to you.

Nearly four years later, I am amazed at the changes that have occurred. For instance, Veterans no longer have to drop their claims in the mail and can instead file online, our claims processors can now work your claim from start to finish electronically and Veterans can automatically add dependents online. And starting today, we are making it easier to file a claim. By using standardized forms – much like applying for a driver’s license – you won’t have to wonder which form to use, or which one is best for you. There is now only one form for filing each benefit – compensation, pension and dependency indemnity compensation and one form for submitting an appeal for a compensation claim.

Here are two major changes we want you to know:

First, when you file a claim, you must use one of these forms:

  • Veterans filing compensation claims should still use eBenefits. It continues to be the fastest and easiest way to file a claim for compensation. In fact, the form is already built into the system.
  • If you prefer not to file online you must complete and submit VA Form 21-526EZ,Application for Disability Compensation and Related Compensation Benefits, to VA
  • Wartime Veterans filing pension claims must complete and mail VA Form 21-527EZ, Application for Pension
  • Survivors filing for dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC), survivors pension, and accrued benefits must be filed on VA Form 21-534EZ, Application for DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits

What benefits can i claim as a single parent

Visit explore.va.gov for more information on using standard forms to file a claim.

Second, if you plan on appealing your claim’s decision, VA will provide you an easy-to-understand form that allows VA to quickly determine why you disagree with the decision. This is called the Standard Notice of Disagreement, or VA Form 21-0958. If you receive a compensation decision on or after March 24, you will have to use this form if you want to appeal. Those wanting to appeal pension and survivors benefits are not required to use the standard NOD at this time.

But wait, those forms aren’t new!

You’re right. VA has used these forms for years, but they were optional. In that time, we’ve seen how use of these forms has gone a long way in removing confusion and easing processing delays in the claims process.

Finally, for Veterans and survivors who want to file a claim, but need more time to gather information, we’ve standardized what used to be known as an informal claim by using a new intent to file a claim process. This basically means you or your representative can submit information, including what general benefit type you are seeking (i.e., compensation, pension, or survivors benefits) to preserve an effective date for benefits while you take up to one year to gather the evidence necessary to support your claim and complete the required application form. This process is completely optional. If you already have the information you need to file a formal claim, you should file the formal claim instead of using the intent to file a claim process.

The Intent to File may be submitted in one of four ways:

  1. Through your accredited Veterans Service Organization, which can submit it electronically on your behalf
  2. Electronically via eBenefits by initiating and completing the personal information page, and saving (but not submitting) the application
  3. Completing and mailing the paper VA Form 21-0966, Intent to File a Claim for Compensation and/or Pension, or Survivors Pension and/or DIC to VA
  4. Informing a VA call center representative over the phone or a public contact representative in person at a VA regional office

This change allows VA to award increased benefits retroactive to the date of medical treatment as long as you submit your intent to file within one year of your treatment and the required claim form is filed within the same year as your intent to file.

There’s still more work to do, and we have more ideas, but everyday we’re working hard to improve your experience at VA. These forms will help take out the guess work so many of you, me included, have experienced.

Editor s note: Still have questions? Visit explore.va.gov for more information on using standard forms to file a claim.

Cat Trombley is a public affairs specialist with the Veterans Benefits Administration. Prior to working for VA, she was an assistant director at a Veteran service organization and represented Veterans before the Board of Veterans’ Appeals. She is also an Air Force Veteran and married to a Marine Corps Veteran.


Advice and Support for Single Dads: Financial, what benefits can i claim as a single


Financial Advice

The following pages will give you basic information on benefits, entitlements and maintenance for single parents. We have also listed useful organisations who will be able to give you further information.

Income Support

What is Income Support?

This is extra money to help people on a low income.

It is for people who don’t have to sign on as unemployed.

This could be if you are:

  • sick or disabled
  • a lone parent responsible for a child under 12 years of age
  • a carer, or
  • registered blind.

Can I get Income Support?

It is for people who:

  • are 16 to 59 years old
  • have a low income
  • work less than 16 hours a week
  • are not in full-time study
  • do not get Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • do not have savings above £16,000, and
  • live in Great Britain

Employment and Support Allowance

What is Employment and Support Allowance?

Employment and Support Allowance replaced Incapacity Benefit and Income Support, paid because of an illness or disability, for new claims from 27 October 2008. If you are currently receiving these benefits you will continue to receive them, so long as you continue to satisfy the entitlement conditions.

Although, Employment and Support Allowance will initially be for new customers only, you will be fully eligible for the work-focused help which will be available with the Employment and Support Allowance and can access this on a voluntary basis.

Employment and Support Allowance is a new way of helping people with an illness or disability to move into work, if they are able.

There is evidence which shows that people are better off in work, not only financially, but in terms of their health and well-being, their self-esteem and the future prospects for themselves and their family.

Employment and Support Allowance offers you personalised support and financial help, so that you can engage in appropriate work, if you are able.

It gives you access to a specially trained personal adviser and a wide range of further services including employment, training and condition management support, to help you manage and cope with your illness or disability in a work context.

Central to Employment and Support Allowance is the new medical assessment called the Work Capability Assessment which assesses what you can do, rather than what you can’t, and identifies the health related support you might need.

Most people claiming Employment and Support Allowance will be expected to take appropriate steps to help prepare for work, including attending a series of work-focused interviews with their personal adviser.

Under Employment and Support Allowance if you have an illness or disability that severely affects your ability to work, you will get increased financial support and will not be expected to prepare for a return to work; however you can volunteer to do so if you want to.

Tax credits are payments from the government. If you’re responsible for at least one child or young person who normally lives with you, you may qualify for Child Tax Credit. If you work, but earn low wages, you may qualify for Working Tax Credit.

Who can get tax credits?

Nine out of ten families with children get tax credits, but you don’t need to have children to qualify. You may also qualify if you are working and earning low pay.

How much do you get?

The amount of tax credits you get depends on things like:

  • how many children you have living with you
  • whether you work – and how many hours you work
  • if you pay for childcare
  • if you or any child living with you has a disability
  • if you’re aged 50 plus and are coming off benefits

Your payments also depend on your income. The lower your income, the more tax credit you can get.

Mr and Mrs Khan both work full-time. Between them, they earn about £25,000 a year. They have three children. They get about £87 a week in tax credits.

If their income was higher, and they earned about £50,000 a year, they’d get about £10 a week instead.

Jon Barry is aged 30, not married and lives alone. He works full-time and earns £10,000 a year. He gets about £24 a week in tax credits.

How tax credits work

If you’re married or living with a partner you’ll need to make a joint claim for tax credits. You can only make a single claim if you don’t have a partner.

The Tax Credit Office pay tax credits directly into your bank, building society, Post Office® or National Savings account if it accepts Direct Payment – either weekly or every four weeks.

Who gets the payments?

If you’re both working and you both qualify for Working Tax Credit, you can decide who’ll get the payments.

If you’re claiming Child Tax Credit and you’re in a couple you need to decide which one of you is the children’s main carer. If you’re the main carer then the money will be paid to you.

How tax credits payments work

The tax credits payments you receive are based on your current personal circumstances and your income from the tax year that ended on the 5 April 2009.

If you’re making a new claim for tax credits your payments will usually run from the date of your claim to the end of the tax year. For example, if you make a claim on 10 November 2009, your payments will be worked out from that date until 5 April 2010.

Each year during April, May and June the Tax Credit Office write to you asking you to:

  • check the information they have about your personal circumstances
  • confirm the income you received in the year that has just ended
  • renew your claim

This helps the Tax Credit Office to check that the payments they have made to you were correct. It also allows them to base your payments for the year ahead on the right amount of income.

Sometimes you will have been paid too much or not enough. If this happens the Tax Credit Office will make an adjustment to make sure that your payments are correct. Any payments they make from 6 April 2010 to the date on which you renew your claim are temporary or provisional and if you don’t renew, you may be asked to pay them back.

Changes at home and work

If your circumstances change it can affect the amount of money you should be getting. So please contact the Tax Credit Office as soon as possible to tell them about any changes.

Contact the Tax Credit Office

You can contact the Tax Credit Helpline on 0845 300 3900 or textphone 0845 300 3909 open from 8.00 am to 8.00 pm seven days a week except Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.

You may be able to get Child Benefit if any of the following apply:

  • your child is under 16
  • your child is over 16 and in education or training that qualifies for Child Benefit
  • your child is 16 or 17, has left education or training that qualifies for Child Benefit and is registered for work, education or training with an approved body

You can get Child Benefit even if your child doesn’t live with you. However, if they live with someone else, you can only get Child Benefit if:

  • you pay towards the upkeep of your child
  • what you pay is at least the same as the amount of Child Benefit you get for your child
  • the person bringing up your child is not getting Child Benefit for them – if you and another person both claim Child Benefit for the same child, only one of you can get it

You can also get Child Benefit for a child even if you are not their parent, but you have to be responsible for them to qualify.

How much Child Benefit will you get?

There are two separate amounts, with a higher amount for your eldest (or only) child. You get £20.00 a week for your eldest child and £13.20 a week for each of your other children.

How is Child Benefit paid?

Child Benefit can be paid into any bank, building society, or National Savings Investments (NS I) account that accepts Direct Payment. It’s usually paid every four weeks, but it can be paid weekly if you are getting Income Support, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, income related Employment and Support Allowance or if you are a single parent.

Child Maintenance Options provides impartial information and support to help both parents make informed choices about child maintenance.

The fact that they are impartial means they are there to help both parents and aren’t biased towards any one way of arranging child maintenance.

They can help you for example:

  • if you’re separating from the other parent or are not living with them and you need to set up a child maintenance arrangement
  • if you’re thinking of switching from a private agreement to an arrangement using the Child Support Agency (CSA), or the other way round
  • if your child maintenance arrangement has broken down or is not working as you’d like it to.

If you’re a guardian, relative or friend, or if you have a professional interest in finding out more about child maintenance, they may also be able to help you.


Can I Claim Benefit, Can I Claim Benefit, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council, what benefits can i


Can I Claim Benefit?

You can make a claim for Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction if:

  • You pay rent to a private landlord, housing association, or a council property. But you cannot claim Housing Benefit if you rent from close relatives or the landlord also lives in the same property. A close relative is a parent/step parent or sibling/step sibling. However, if the relative has a commercial tenancy agreement (ie they are a landlord who has let properties previously) then you may be able to claim
  • You have to pay Council Tax on your home. But if you live in a property that is band E or higher you will only be paid up to the amount for a band D property
  • Your savings are less than 16,000 for Housing Benefit and 6000 for Council Tax Reduction applications
  • You work full time or part time (employed or self-employed) and get a low wage
  • You get Benefit or Tax Credit managed by the Department for Work and Pensions, the Inland Revenue or any other low income.

The rules on claiming Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction for self-employed people, students, people from abroad and people who have savings are different to those who get Benefit or Pensions.

There are also different rules for people who have adult children or adults who are not boarders/lodgers or joint tenants. You can find more information on all of the above situations in our related downloads.

How Much Benefit Could I Get?

This is based on the amount of income and savings you have. The more you have the less you get. When we work out your Benefit we take into account:

  • How much money you have coming in each week

Working age – there will be a cap on the amount of benefits that you can get. The Benefit Cap forms part of the Welfare Reform Changes that came into force from April 2013. There are a number of benefits that are included in the Benefit Cap as well as a number of benefits and circumstances that will exclude you from having the cap applied. The Benefit Cap factsheet in Related downloads can explain this further.

If you are not excluded from the benefit amount cap, it will be set at:

  • 500 per week for couples and lone parents; or
  • 350 per week for single adults.
  • How much you have in savings and investments
  • Who lives in your household and their circumstances
  • How much rent and Council Tax you have to pay
  • Whether you are of pension age or working age
  • How many rooms you need for your household (Housing Benefit only).

Renting from South Essex Homes or Housing Associations

Working age – the amount that you are awarded for Housing Benefit depends on the number of rooms you are allowed for your family circumstances, this is known as Size Criteria . Size Criteria forms part of the Welfare Reform Changes that came into force from April 2013. If you are considered to have:

  • 1 extra bedroom you will have a 14% reduction on your Housing Benefit
  • 2 or more extra bedrooms you will have a 25% reduction to your Housing Benefit

You will have to make up the difference yourself. There are some groups of people that are excluded from having the size criteria applied to their claim. For further information about these groups of people please see the Size Criteria Factsheet 2014 in Related Downloads.

Renting from a Private Landlord

If you are working age or pension age the amount you get depends on the Local Housing Allowance rate for the size property you are claiming for. The rates and are updated yearly and can be found in the LHA Rates 2017/2018 Poster in Related Downloads.

Payment on Two Homes

Housing Benefit is normally only paid for one home at a time. However, there are some exceptions where the council may consider paying benefit on two homes. These exceptions are:

  • You have moved into rented accommodation due to fear of violence
  • You are a student/trainee, one of a couple and have to live in separate rented accommodation
  • You have a large family and the council has housed you in two properties
  • You have moved to a new home which you have to pay rent for, but still have to pay rent for a period of time on the old property. This is known as unavoidable overlapping liability.

For further information on payment on two homes please read the Payment on Two Homes leaflet in Related Downloads.

Calculating your Entitlement

To find out an accurate assessment of what you could be entitled to please use the Entitled To Benefit Calculator. Not only will it calculate what you are currently entitled to based on your circumstances but it will also calculate whether you will be better off in work and how Universal Credit will affect you once active in the area.


Why Your Workers – Compensation Claim Could Be Denied, can i claim compensation.#Can #i #claim


Why Your Workers Compensation Claim Could Be Denied

Workers’ compensation insurers deny many legitimate claims, forcing honest and innocent employees to hire a lawyer and go through the workers’ compensation system to enforce their rights. Why do they deny rightful claims? Some of the main reasons why workers’ compensation insurers deny claims are the following:

  • your injury was unwitnessed
  • you didn’t report your injury immediately
  • there is a discrepancy between your accident report and initial medical records
  • your initial medical records indicate the presence of illegal drugs in your system
  • you filed a workers’ compensation claim after you were fired or laid off
  • you refused to give the insurance company a recorded statement or refused to sign medical authorizations.

Your Injury Was Unwitnessed

Workers’ compensation insurers never like unwitnessed injuries. They question the vast majority of unwitnessed accidents. If you get hurt at work and no one saw your accident, there is nothing that you can do about that. But you should certainly make sure to report the injury to your co-workers and to your supervisor immediately, and you should make sure that you tell everyone the exact same thing about how your injury occurred.

You Didn’t Report Your Injury Immediately

Workers’ compensation insurers don’t like cases where the accident doesn’t get reported immediately either. They assume that, if you don’t report the accident immediately, you weren’t really hurt. Moreover, most states’ workers’ compensation laws require you to report work related injuries within a short time period, sometimes in as little as seven days. Don’t wait. If you get hurt at work, and you think that your injury has the slightest chance of causing you to miss any work, report it immediately to a supervisor and fill out an accident report. That will comply with the law and will help your chances of getting benefits as soon as you need them.

There is a Discrepancy Between Your Accident Report and Initial Medical Records

Insurers will often deny workers’ compensation claims if the employee’s statements about how the accident happened are inconsistent. If you tell your supervisor that the accident happened one way, but tell your doctor that the accident happened in a different way, that will hurt your case. Make sure that, when you tell co-workers, supervisors, people in the personnel office, and health care providers about the accident happened, you are consistent.

Your Initial Medical Records Indicate the Presence of Illegal Drugs in Your System

If an employee goes to the emergency room after a work-related accident, and the emergency room records show illegal drugs in the employee’s system, the insurer is almost definitely not going to voluntarily pay workers’ compensation benefits to that employee.

You Filed a Claim After You Were Fired or Laid Off

Sometimes, employees who were legitimately injured at work delay filing a workers’ compensation claim and by the time they get around to filing the claim, they get fired or laid off. Insurers never like workers’ compensation claims that are filed after the employee gets fired or laid off. They almost always assume that the claim is nothing more than a revenge claim. This is another reason not to wait to file a claim if you have a legitimate work related injury. If you get laid off before you file your claim, you are going to have a difficult time convincing the insurer and the workers’ compensation judge that you really did have a work related injury.

You Refused to Give the Insurance Company a Recorded Statement or Refused to Sign Medical Authorizations

Workers’ compensation insurers will often ask injured employees to give a recorded statement describing the accident and the injuries. Unfortunately, that puts the employee in a difficult position. As a general rule, giving a statement will not help an injured employee who does not have a lawyer. Nor is the employee legally required to give the insurer a recorded statement. If the insurer asks for a statement, that is usually a sign that the insurer has a problem with the case. If the employee gives the statement, the insurer is still probably not going to put that employee on workers’ compensation benefits. But if the employee refuses to give the statement, then the adjuster can tell the employee that his/her failure to give the statement prevented the insurer from starting compensation benefits.

Insurers will also generally ask the employee to sign medical authorizations that will allow the insurer to write directly to the employee’s health care providers to get the employee’s medical records and bills. Again, the employee generally has no legal obligation to sign medical authorizations. An injured employee who is filing a workers’ compensation claim does have the obligation to give his/her medical records and bills relating to the work accident to the insurer, but he/she can meet that obligation by simply getting the records on his/her own and sending them to the insurer.

However, insurers don’t like when employees do that. They don’t trust injured employees. Insurers like to get the medical records on their own. That way they can be sure that they get a complete file, not one that has been cherry-picked. The problem with medical authorizations is that sometimes the insurer will invade your privacy and get medical records that do not relate to the work accident.

If the insurer pushes you to sign a medical authorization and you would prefer not to sign one, then you should contact a workers’ compensation attorney immediately, and let him/her deal with the insurer.


TOP Injury Lawyers, Compare Injury Lawyers, Personal Injury Claim, can i claim compensation.#Can #i #claim


Compare Personal Injury Lawyers in Seconds

Finding a good personal injury lawyer or an accident claim company for your compensation claim can be difficult especially since there are so many. Think about it! You see so many adverts on TV, but do you know who the best personal injury claim solicitor for you is, or who offers you the most compensation online?

Don’t just fall for the trap of the adverts, as they all claim to be the right solicitor or accident management company for you. Get the BEST accident claim DEALS and SERVICES available on the personal injury market. Claim for injury, claim for accident or claim for compensation with recommended injury solicitors.

Compare personal injury lawyers services to MAXIMISE your injury compensation claim. Compare Compensation Claims is keeping your cost of making an accident claim to minimum, so you as a client can benefit from more personal injury compensation services. You control what compensation services you are given for your personal injury compensation claim.

This is where Compare Compensation Claims excels. We provide a comprehensive range of top personal injury lawyers injury compensation packages. Get instant results, view ratings profiles for each accident claim solicitor independently make an informed choice for your accident claim. There are solicitors who specialise in specific types of personal injury claims, for example, if you have a car accident claim, then you will want to work with solicitors who specialise in road traffic accidents who also offer you a courtesy car. Likewise if you are making a work accident claim or even a public liability claim, you should look for injury solicitors that specifically specialise in these accident types when making a personal injury compensation claim as you want the right injury solicitor, with the right expertise, for your EXACT case.

Compare Compensation Claim’s user-friendly website makes it easy for you to find an injury compensation package that suits your needs a personal injury lawyer that meets your requirements. Claim for personal injury, claim for accident or claim for compensation by making a personal injury compensation claim the smart way.