Ontario Small Claims Court, Justice Matters, court of federal claims.#Court #of #federal #claims


Court of federal claims

Court of federal claims Plus much more

Our firm practices primarily in the Ontario Small Claims Court , Provincial Offences Court and the Landlord and Tenant Board . We have been in business since 2001 and we have appeared in court over 3,000 times.

Court of federal claims

Provincial Offences

Court of federal claims

Many convictions under the Highway Traffic Act can have serious implications for your driver s license and your automobile insurance. Don t do it alone. Talk to us first.

Small Claims Court

Court of federal claims

The Ontario Small Claims Court can hear most lawsuits that involve claims for money or the return of property up to a maximum of $25,000. Call us for a free consultation.

Landlord Tenant

Court of federal claims

Under Ontario s Residential Tenancies Act both landlords and tenants have certain rights and responsibilities to each other. Ensure that those rights are protected.

Court of federal claims

Court of federal claims1. Litigation is a knowledge-intensive enterprise.

There are about 100 federal and provincial statutes we have knowledge of. In addition there are dozens of common law and equitable principles as well as the Small Claims Court Rules and related procedures.

Court of federal claims2. Court staff cannot give you legal advice.

Court staff can only provide limited assistance with court forms and procedures. And as indicated in the previous point there is far more to litigation than filling out a form.

Court of federal claims3. It s not like the reality court-shows seen on television.

Many people think they can just show up and “tell their story. This is not the case. Each party is responsible to present their evidence, make appropriate legal submissions and know the law as it applies to their case.

Court of federal claims

City of Toronto.

Court of federal claimsOur team of Ontario Small Claims Court paralegals continues to service the Toronto Small Claims Court which is the busiest Small Claims Court in Canada.

The 905 Region.

Court of federal claimsFrom our base in the City of Mississauga we service the entire Greater Toronto Area from Hamilton to Oshawa to Newmarket.

Kitchener Area.

Court of federal claimsWe are able to recommend a local paralegal to those clients who require representation in the Kitchener-Waterloo area.

Court of federal claims

Court of federal claims

Court of federal claims

Small Claims Court Info

Court Locations

Small Claims Court Quiz

Court of federal claims

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  • District of Minnesota, United States Bankruptcy Court, court of federal claims.#Court #of #federal #claims


    United States Bankruptcy Court

    Honorable Kathleen H. Sanberg, Chief Judge • Lori A. Vosejpka, Clerk of Court

    Court of federal claims

    Free Bankruptcy Advice Clinic

    The Bankruptcy Advice Clinic offers up to 15 minutes of basic information and bankruptcy-related advice from members of the bar.

    Court of federal claims

    File a Proof of Claim Electronically

    File a Proof of Claim quickly and easily. No special software or CM/ECF account required!

    Court of federal claims

    Sign Up for Electronic Bankruptcy Noticing

    Receive orders and notices by email. It’s fast, free, and convenient!

    Court of federal claims

    Stay Connected

    From Opinions to Court Closures to CM/ECF Updates, choose to receive email updates on the topics that matter the most to you.

    Court of federal claims

    Court Locations

    200 Warren E. Burger Federal Building and United States Courthouse

    316 North Robert Street

    St. Paul, MN 55101

    301 U.S. Courthouse

    300 South Fourth Street

    Minneapolis, MN 55415

    404 Gerald W. Heaney Federal Building and

    United States Courthouse and Customhouse

    515 West First Street

    Duluth, MN 55802

    204 Edward J. Devitt United States Courthouse and Federal Building

    118 South Mill Street

    Fergus Falls, MN 56537

    News Announcements

    Court of federal claims

    In re Crosier Fathers and Brothers Province, Inc. (Case No. 17-41681), In re Crosier Fathers of Onamia (Case No. 17-41682) and In re The Crosier Community of Phoenix (Case No. 17-41683)


    District of Minnesota, United States Bankruptcy Court, court of federal claims.#Court #of #federal #claims


    United States Bankruptcy Court

    Honorable Kathleen H. Sanberg, Chief Judge • Lori A. Vosejpka, Clerk of Court

    Court of federal claims

    Free Bankruptcy Advice Clinic

    The Bankruptcy Advice Clinic offers up to 15 minutes of basic information and bankruptcy-related advice from members of the bar.

    Court of federal claims

    File a Proof of Claim Electronically

    File a Proof of Claim quickly and easily. No special software or CM/ECF account required!

    Court of federal claims

    Sign Up for Electronic Bankruptcy Noticing

    Receive orders and notices by email. It’s fast, free, and convenient!

    Court of federal claims

    Stay Connected

    From Opinions to Court Closures to CM/ECF Updates, choose to receive email updates on the topics that matter the most to you.

    Court of federal claims

    Court Locations

    200 Warren E. Burger Federal Building and United States Courthouse

    316 North Robert Street

    St. Paul, MN 55101

    301 U.S. Courthouse

    300 South Fourth Street

    Minneapolis, MN 55415

    404 Gerald W. Heaney Federal Building and

    United States Courthouse and Customhouse

    515 West First Street

    Duluth, MN 55802

    204 Edward J. Devitt United States Courthouse and Federal Building

    118 South Mill Street

    Fergus Falls, MN 56537

    News Announcements

    Court of federal claims

    In re Crosier Fathers and Brothers Province, Inc. (Case No. 17-41681), In re Crosier Fathers of Onamia (Case No. 17-41682) and In re The Crosier Community of Phoenix (Case No. 17-41683)


    Court Role and Structure, United States Courts, court of federal claims.#Court #of #federal #claims


    Court Role and Structure

    Federal courts hear cases involving the constitutionality of a law, cases involving the laws and treaties of the U.S. ambassadors and public ministers, disputes between two or more states, admiralty law, also known as maritime law, and bankruptcy cases.

    The federal judiciary operates separately from the executive and legislative branches, but often works with them as the Constitution requires. Federal laws are passed by Congress and signed by the President. The judicial branch decides the constitutionality of federal laws and resolves other disputes about federal laws. However, judges depend on our government’s executive branch to enforce court decisions.

    Courts decide what really happened and what should be done about it. They decide whether a person committed a crime and what the punishment should be. They also provide a peaceful way to decide private disputes that people can’t resolve themselves. Depending on the dispute or crime, some cases end up in the federal courts and some end up in state courts. Learn more about the different types of federal courts.

    Supreme Court

    The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States. Article III of the U.S. Constitution created the Supreme Court and authorized Congress to pass laws establishing a system of lower courts. In the federal court system’s present form, 94 district level trial courts and 13 courts of appeals sit below the Supreme Court. Learn more about the Supreme Court.

    Courts of Appeals

    There are 13 appellate courts that sit below the U.S. Supreme Court, and they are called the U.S. Courts of Appeals. The 94 federal judicial districts are organized into 12 regional circuits, each of which has a court of appeals. The appellate court’s task is to determine whether or not the law was applied correctly in the trial court. Appeals courts consist of three judges and do not use a jury.

    A court of appeals hears challenges to district court decisions from courts located within its circuit, as well as appeals from decisions of federal administrative agencies.

    In addition, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has nationwide jurisdiction to hear appeals in specialized cases, such as those involving patent laws, and cases decided by the U.S. Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

    Bankruptcy Appellate Panels

    Bankruptcy Appellate Panels (BAPs) are 3-judge panels authorized to hear appeals of bankruptcy court decisions. These panels are a unit of the federal courts of appeals, and must be established by that circuit.

    District Courts

    The nation’s 94 district or trial courts are called U.S. District Courts. District courts resolve disputes by determining the facts and applying legal principles to decide who is right.

    Trial courts include the district judge who tries the case and a jury that decides the case. Magistrate judges assist district judges in preparing cases for trial. They may also conduct trials in misdemeanor cases.

    There is at least one district court in each state, and the District of Columbia. Each district includes a U.S. bankruptcy court as a unit of the district court. Four territories of the United States have U.S. district courts that hear federal cases, including bankruptcy cases: Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

    There are also two special trial courts. The Court of International Trade addresses cases involving international trade and customs laws. The U.S. Court of Federal Claims deals with most claims for money damages against the U.S. government.

    Bankruptcy Courts

    Federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases involving personal, business, or farm bankruptcy. This means a bankruptcy case cannot be filed in state court. Through the bankruptcy process, individuals or businesses that can no longer pay their creditors may either seek a court-supervised liquidation of their assets, or they may reorganize their financial affairs and work out a plan to pay their debts.

    Article I Courts

    Congress created several Article I, or legislative courts, that do not have full judicial power. Judicial power is the authority to be the final decider in all questions of Constitutional law, all questions of federal law and to hear claims at the core of habeas corpus issues. Article I Courts are:


    U-Change Lock Industries, Inc #defense #contractors, #contractors, #contractor, #government #contractors, #federal #contractors, #government #contracting, #government


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    U-Change Lock Industries, Inc. Government Contractor in Mustang, OK

    Higher Than Average

    The principal NAICS category of U-Change Lock Industries, Inc. is Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) (561621) as measured by the total amount obligated in contract awards to the vendor since FY2007.

    In its latest full year of contract work (FY2016), U-Change Lock Industries, Inc. was obligated a total of $15,033, an amount that was 26% more than the average vendor from Oklahoma specializing in Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) and 52% more than all vendors in the U.S. classified by this NAICS category.

    Other Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) Vendors in Oklahoma

    Dollars Obligated (Latest Year)

    Principal Category (NAICS)

    Principal Product or Service (PSC)

    Latest Fiscal Year

    Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) (561621)

    Installation of Equipment: Alarm, Signal and Security Detection Systems (N063)

    Broken Arrow, OK

    Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) (561621)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Fire Control Equipment (J012)

    Oklahoma City, OK

    Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) (561621)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Fire Control Equipment (J012)

    Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) (561621)

    Installation of Equipment: Alarm, Signal and Security Detection Systems (N063)

    Higher Than Average

    The principal Product or Service Code (PSC) of U-Change Lock Industries, Inc. is Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099) as measured by the total amount obligated in contract awards to the vendor since FY2007.

    In its latest full year of contract work (FY2016), U-Change Lock Industries, Inc. was obligated a total of $15,033, an amount that was 41% more than the average vendor from Oklahoma specializing in Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous and 118% more than all vendors in the U.S. classified by this PSC.

    Other Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous Vendors in Oklahoma

    Dollars Obligated (Latest Year)

    Principal Category (NAICS)

    Principal Product or Service (PSC)

    Latest Fiscal Year

    Oklahoma City, OK

    $2.91 million USD

    Facilities Support Services (561210)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)

    Engineering Services (541330)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)

    Broken Arrow, OK

    Commercial and Industrial Machinery and Equipment (except Automotive and Electronic) Repair and Maintenance (811310)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)

    Oklahoma City, OK

    Other Building Equipment Contractors (238290)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)

    Other Services to Buildings and Dwellings (561790)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)

    Commercial and Industrial Machinery and Equipment (except Automotive and Electronic) Repair and Maintenance (811310)

    Maintenance, Repair and Rebuilding of Equipment: Miscellaneous (J099)


    Regulations in the Nevada Title Loan Industry #usa #money #today, #nevada, #federal #and #state #legislation,


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    Regulations in the Nevada Title Loan Industry

    LAS VEGAS. May 31, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Short-term auto title loans for consumers with bad credit carry a stigma: They’re dangerous. They’ll create a bottomless pit of debt. The title loan will cost the borrower their car.

    Is the stigma accurate? Sometimes it is. That’s why recent regulations imposed on the title loan industry are so important.

    To date, the Nevada legislature has established consumer protections from predatory title loan companies in two different years, 2005 and 2007. Some highlights:

    Lenders must be state-licensed.

    How this protects the consumer: A state-licensed loan business is more credible, more responsible, and more accountable than an unlicensed entity.

    Title loans must not extend past seven months, total. The maximum loan term is 30 days, renewable no more than six times.

    How this protects the consumer: In a high-interest loan, time is money. A 300% APR loan can potentially repay itself three times every year, over and over. Nevada law caps the amount of time a loan can be extended, eliminating the ability of the loan company to trap consumers in an unescapable debt cycle.

    The lender must give 30 days written notice prior to vehicle repossession.

    How this protects the consumer: No vehicle repossession will be a surprise. Borrowers in default will have time to attempt the loan repayment or make alternative transportation plans.

    In the event of a loan default, the lender can collect no more than the collateral vehicle as repayment for the loan.

    How this protects the consumer: The lender is not allowed to pursue any other types of payment or assets beyond the vehicle itself. Once the vehicle is repossessed, the loan is ended, and the borrower is free from any further responsibility.

    The lender can not offer a loan higher in value than the fair market value of the vehicle.

    How this protects the consumer: A bigger loan means bigger payments, increasing the likelihood that the borrower will find themselves in default at some point during the course of the loan. This law also protects the lender; as the lender can not collect any payment beyond the vehicle itself in the event of a default, they are protected from overloaning themselves out of business.

    The lender can not threaten a criminal process to collect on the loan.

    How this protects the consumer: Title loan companies are not allowed aggressive collection practices. In a Nevada title loan, only the vehicle is at risk, not the borrower’s security, sanity, or health.

    Nevada still allows lenders some freedoms most other states do not. Nevada does not cap the amount of interest that can be charged per title loan, counting on the protections of time limits and collections policies to guard consumers.

    In all business, some companies strive to keep customers happy, while other strive to squeeze out whatever profits they can. No government can fully protect a borrower. Anyone searching for an ethical car title loan company should know their rights, do their research, and read their contracts.

    For reputable title loans in Las Vegas. look to this loan company.

    This article does not offer legal advise. These are not laws, they are the summaries of laws interspersed with the author’s opinons. Reference: NV State Legislature .

    SOURCE USA Money Today


    Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange-MARE #adoptions, #adopciones, #adoption, #massachusetts, #state, #adopcion, #adoptions, #wednesday’s #child, #children #first,


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    MARE finds “a permanent place to call home ” for children in foster care, including sibling groups and children who are traditionally harder to place. We do this by recruiting and supporting families throughout the adoption process, while targeting recruitment efforts to find families for specific children. So far, MARE has helped over 6,300 children join their forever families.

    News Events

    Thank you to our leading partners:

    MARE Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange, Inc. 19 Needham Street, Suite 206, Newton, MA� 02461
    617-964-MARE (6273) or 1-800-882-1176 617-542-1006

    NON DISCRIMINATION POLICY

    MARE welcomes and serves all constituents without regard to an individual’s actual or perceived race, creed, color, ethnicity, national origin, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, physical or mental ability, veteran status, domestic partnership or marital status. This policy also applies to employment practice, internal promotions, training, opportunities for advancement, terminations, outside vendors, service clients, use of contractors and consultants, and dealings with the general public.


    Wiretap Act #federal #tax #lawyers


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    How the Wiretap Act Protects Personal Privacy

    The Wiretap Act. codified by 18 U.S. Code 2511, is a federal law aimed at protecting privacy in communications with other persons. Typically, when you think of a “wiretap ,” the first thing that comes to mind is someone listening to your telephone calls. But the Act protects more than that. Under the Act, it is illegal to:

    • intentionally or purposefully
    • intercept, disclose, or use the contents of
      1. any wire, oral, or electronic communication
      2. through the use of a “device.”

      The Act provides criminal and civil penalties for violations, although it creates various exceptions to when interceptions and disclosures are illegal.

      Although the Act defines most of the above terms, federal cases that interpret the Act play a large role in understanding their meaning and how they apply to any particular case or situation. In addition, most states have laws similar to or based on the Act, also meant to protect individuals’ privacy.

      What Is “Intentional” Wiretapping?

      “Intentional” means that someone has intercepted a communication deliberately. A mistake of law or “ignorance of the law” will not be a defense. So, for example, if someone misunderstands the Act and think that it is not illegal to intercept another person’s telephone call or hack into their email, but the tap was in fact illegal, the person will still be liable under the Act, having intentionally intercepted the call.

      What the Wiretap Act Means by Interception, Disclosure, and Use

      “Interception” is the acquisition of the contents of a communication, or, in other words, listening to another person’s telephone conversation or reading another person’s email, text, or other messages.

      Generally, to be in violation of the Act, the interception has to take place at the same time the communication is made. So, for example, listening in on a live telephone conversation is an “interception,” but accessing stored files on a computer is not. (Often, however, such activity is separately illegal.)

      “Disclosing” includes telling another person the contents of the communication, as well as telling the general nature or “gist” of it. Disclosure is illegal if someone knows or suspects that the communication was intercepted in violation of the Act.

      So, if someone illegally intercepts a telephone communication in which the participants discuss their involvement in a crime, and give that information to a newspaper reporter, the wiretapper can be liable for violating the Act. This might seem strange, since the person was attempting to p ublicize a crime. But the conduct is nevertheless illegal.

      “Use” requires more than disclosure. The idea here is that the communication is being utilized for some type of gain. For example, someone who illegally records a conversation by an ex-wife and later uses it to bolster a child-custody dispute case could be liable under the Act.

      What the Wiretap Act Means by Wire, Oral, or Electronic Communication

      “Wire” communications are made through the use of wire, cable, or similar connection between the point of origin and the point of reception. A telephone call is the classic example.

      “Oral” communications are uttered or spoken, where the speaker has an expectation that the communication is private and will not be intercepted. For example, there is no violation of the Act when agents intercept and record a prisoner’s conversations with other inmates, because the prisoner has no reasonable expectation of privacy in that setting.

      An “electronic” communication is one that does not contain the human voice, but contains things like words or pictures. Email messages are the best example of such communications.

      Under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), codified as 18 U.S. Code 2510, which protects email messages from interception and disclosure to third parties, an exception allows employers to monitor employee email in the ordinary course of business. Although the meaning of that exception is not yet settled, it may permit an employer to monitor “business-related,” but not personal, communications. Courts may also look to whether the employer had a legitimate business reason for monitoring employee communications.

      What the Wiretap Act Means by Use of a “Device”

      The communication has to be intercepted by use of a “device,” that is, some mechanical or electrical tool or apparatus, such as a tape recorder, in order to fall under the Wiretap Act.

      There are two exceptions for “devices” that can be used without violating the Act:

      • Telephones and related equipment that are used by a subscriber in the ordinary course of business, including “extension” telephones. The idea here is to allow employers to listen in on employee conversations with customers.
      • Hearing aids used to correct or improve subnormal hearing, but not to the point where one’s hearing becomes better than normal. So, someone whose hearing is normal cannot legally use a hearing aid for the purpose of intercepting communications.

      Exceptions to Liability Under the Wiretap Act

      There are two primary exceptions that allow communications to be intercepted without violating the Wiretap Act:

      • The “provider” exception, which allows telephone service providers to listen to or monitor telephone calls once they have been directed to do so by law enforcement officers with a valid court order (“search warrant”) or when it is necessary to provide a customer with service, to inspect the equipment, or to protect the provider’s property or rights, such as when its network is being used without being paid for.
      • Use by law enforcement officials, who can legally intercept communications when one party consents to it. So, if someone is suspected of illegal activities and a government informant consents, agents can listen to and record conversations with the informant.

      Many state laws allow one-party consent to record telephone conversations, but some states require the consent of everyone on the telephone. So, if you are thinking of recording phone calls, even your own, be sure to check the laws in your area before you do so.

      Questions for Your Attorney

      • I think my phone is being tapped. Should I call the telephone company or the police?
      • Can I sue my employer for monitoring my work communications?
      • Can I monitor my employees’ communications?
      • My ex-spouse has been threatening to stop letting me visit my children unless I pay more support. Can I tape our next phone conversation and use it in court?
      • I think my spouse is having an affair. Can I listen to and record the phone conversations that would prove it on our home phone?

      Talk to an attorney


      Second dui offense #dane #county, #wi,owi, #dui, #dwi, #dwi, #dui, #drunk #driving, #procedure, #owi #treatment


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      This page is about the counting of alcohol offenses in Wisconsin when charging OWI / DUI / DWI cases. If you are looking for information about the DUI / OWI Treatment Court in Dane County, or court process for criminal DUI / OWI cases in Dane County you should go to those pages instead.

      DUI / OWI (Drunk Driving) Math inWisconsin

      Criminal Cases that depend on how you count

      In Wisconsin all drunk driving charges after the first one are criminal charges handled in Circuit Court. First offense cases are not charged as crimes unless there is a minor in the car or there is an injury. Both criminal and civil drunk driving charges can have profound consequences. This page is about what counts and does not count as a prior conviction. It may surprise you.

      Which things are counted as prior offenses is listed, confusingly, in Sec. 343.307, Wisconsin Statutes. Penalties (and classification as non-criminal/misdemeanor/felony) is determined by the penalty provisions in Sec. 346.65, Wisconsin Statutes .

      Further, the timing and sequence of arrests and convictions can matter.

      Civil Cases – First Offense

      First Offense OWI / DUI is not treated as a crime in Wisconsin unless there is a child in the vehicle or someone is injured. That does not mean it is treated lightly. First offense OWI / DUI in Wisconsin often results in more significant penalties than in other states that treat this as a crime. However, the procedures are a little different in non-criminal cases and many different courts can hear such cases. If you have never been arrested or cited or in court for an OWI / DUI / Drunk Driving you are treated as a first offender. Except if as an underage drinker you were convicted of an absolute sobriety violation in another state that will count as a prior conviction.

      Any one incident more than ten years ago will not count, but more than one will count. That is if a driver had one prior in May of 1989 a charge in June of 1999 (or 2010) counted as first offense. However if the driver had the May 1989 and the June 1999 offenses (both treated as first offenses) and then another in 2010, the 2010 charge would not be a first offense or second offense but a criminal third offense for court purposes. Again, you can have two first offenses more than ten years apart but not three. The look-back period for a any offense after the second is January 1, 1989. The look-back period to determine if a second actual offense is charged as a second offense is ten years, date of offense to date of offense.

      No offenses before January 1, 1989 are counted.

      Out of State Charges Are Different – Usually in a bad way!

      The following are counted as prior convictions in Wisconsin when they occurred in a different state – even if they would not count in the original state:

      1. Refusing to take a chemical test
      2. A deferred prosecution for OWI / DUI / Drunk Driving / Drugged Driving that did not result in a conviction
      3. Operating as an underage drinker you were convicted of an absolute sobriety violation (would not count if in Wisconsin)
      4. A conviction for OWI / DUI / Drunk Driving / Drugged Driving

      Some offenses in or out of Wisconsin are not counted!

      Some prior convictions are not counted if proper procedures were not followed. This is a complex determination and requires analysis of all relevant records by an experienced attorney. For instance in one of the cases handled by our office a case originally charged as a third offense was properly revised to be a first offense.

      Examples of counting

      Example 1 – 3rd offense following two first offenses

      Fifth Offense – Felony

      Note, this is the same as example 6 except for the date of the second offense and conviction. The fourth offense conviction (third charged) was within 5 years of the second offense and the offense was within 5 years following the second offense conviction. The fourth charge was counted as a third because at the date of conviction there were only two earlier convictions. The third charge was counted as a fourth because at the date of conviction there were three convictions counted.

      Example 8 – Out-of-state deferral without conviction

      Note: State v. Carter . 2010 WI 132 (Dec. 2, 2010) decided saying that the Illinois absolute sobriety suspension counts as a prior offense. This does not necessarily apply to all out-of-state absolute sobriety convictions. Read the case!

      IID Requirement (Ignition Interlock Device) – one more wrinkle on counting

      Repeat Offenses

      An IID is required for all second or subsequent offenses, even if the offense would be counted as a first offense for other penalty purposes. Village of Grafton v. Seatz . 2014 WI App 23 (Jan. 29, 2014). But, see DMV OWI Penalty Chart .

      This is true even if none of the offenses involved alcohol. (No one ever said that the laws had to make sense.)

      More Serious First Offenses

      If there is an alcohol level of .15 or higher (at the time of the offense). Note: The alcohol reading on the evidentiary breath test may be higher than the alcohol level was at the time of the offense! Also, these machines are not calibrated to measure at the .15 level. Talk to a drunk driving defense lawyer!

      If there was an unlawful refusal to take an evidentiary test that is specified in the Wisconsin Implied Consent law.

      Can last longer than the revocation even if ordered for the same length of time – usually will last longer!

      If an 18-month revocation period and an 18-month IID requirement are both imposed, do they end at the same time? Usually not. The revocation period gives credit for any period of administrative suspension (up to six months). In addition, the revocation period runs out once the time is up. The IID requirement does not start running until the driver has a license (occupational or regular).

      Applies to all cars owned or driven, whether or not an owned car can even run!

      If the DMV has record of the driver owning a vehicle, even if it has been junked or is undrivable, the driver will be required by the DMV to install an IID in it unless the vehicle is exempted by the Court.

      Warning – Use at your own risk.

      This page is not intended to be legal advice or substitute for legal advice. It is intended to provide general information. Legal advice can only be given with a full understanding of the actual facts of a case, generally in a face-to-face consultation. Note that there are exceptions to many of the statements made on this page. No one should act or refrain from acting based on anything stated in this web page. My office does not give legal advice to non-clients over the phone or internet. Further, the law (and procedures) in drunk driving cases are changing rapidly. This page reflects procedures in place in Wisconsin on January 1, 2014. In this session of the legislature, the Assembly has passed bills that would change many things stated on this page; those changes have not been adopted by the Senate, yet.

      DUI / OWI Wisconsin – How this office approaches DUI / OWI cases. The need for an assessment and / or treatment along with competent legal assistance is discussed.

      DUI / OWI Field Sobriety Tests in Wisconsin – A look at what field sobriety tests are – and are not – in Wisconsin.

      DUI / OWI (Drunk Driving) Wisconsin Ten Day Warning – Why a defendant needs to take action before the court process even gets going.

      DUI / OWI Treatment Court – an option that must be considered in Dane County for some third-offense cases

      Wisconsin Judicial Sentencing Guidelines for OWI / DUI / Drunk Driving cases by County. Each judicial district has different guidelines.

      Click on images above for larger view This page last revised: 09 Feb 2017 17:43:51 -0600.

      Email Warning (links below)

      By clicking on a button or link below you will be attempting to send an email to the office of Attorney Charles Kyle Kenyon. We do not give legal advice or opinions to non-clients over the phone, the Internet, or by email. Sending an email to us does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential information should not be sent by email. Do not expect that information sent us will be kept secret. If your email is about a legal matter please restrict your email to:

      1. Your name address and phone number.
      2. The County involved.
      3. A time when it would be convenient for someone from this office to contact you and set up a time for you to consult with an attorney.

      Clicking on the button or link below means you have read the above and agree to keep any communication about legal matters within these limits.

      Copyright 1997-2017 Charles Kyle Kenyon. Madison, Wisconsin, all rights reserved.

      This is a living hypertext document. If you find any errors, of fact or in links, please contact me so that they may be corrected. Please also write to me for permission to copy. You can reach me at lawyer at Add Balance.

      Note: NO email is sent from this domain. If you receive any email with a domain name of addbalance.com. it is spam and not from me!

      The name of this file is duimath.htm.


      ODRC – London Correctional Institution – Inmate Search – London, OH #inmate, #send #inmate #money,


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      ODRC – London Correctional Institution

      ODRC – London Correctional Institution is classed as a medium security facility. It has a strengthened perimeter fence and electronic detection systems to ensure inmates stay within the confined areas within the facility. To help inmates prepare themselves to rejoin the wider community, offers a wide range of work and treatment programs. The medium classification means that the inmates are supervised 24/7 with controlled movements. Medium and security prisons house more serious offenders, but inmates can also be sent to serve time in a lower security facilities for things like good behavior at the end of a sentence.

      ODRC – London Correctional Institution is a state prison. This penitentiary is operated by the state of Ohio Department of Corrections (DOC) and is used to house and rehabilitate criminals sentenced by a judge to a specific commitment term. The state s prisons are funded by state tax money to provide food and clothes to inmates and to train and hire employees to operate the prison efficiently.

      Convicted criminals are sent to prison as punishment and are property of the state . They must follow very strict rules of conduct and order or they are held to additional punishment like loss of privileges or isolation. They do retain some rights as granted by the state and federal constitutions. Prison is like a town inside a town. There is a mayor (the warden ), police (correctional staff ), a jail (disciplinary segregation unit, the SHU, the hole ), laws (administrative rules ), judges (hearings officers ), a store (the commissary ), housing (cells ), medical care (infirmary ), library (law, education and lending ), civic organizations (clubs ), worship (chapel ), a park (the recreation yard ), a cafeteria (chow hall ), and the inmates all have a job that assist in keeping the facility running.
      There is no privacy in prison – inmates dress, shower, and use the bathroom in the company of other inmates. Inmates are required to make their bunks and keep their personal possessions neat. All inmates wear identical clothing and must carry their identification card with them at all times. Most possessions allowed must be purchased from the canteen. Meal times are assigned and inmates have 25 minutes in which to eat and leave the dining room, there are no seconds. Inmates are subject to searches of their person and/or cell at any time. All movements of inmates from one area to another are monitored and supervised.
      Visitation is a privilege reserved for inmates in good standing and contact is limited. All phone calls (except legal calls) are recorded and monitored and must be made collect or with a pre-paid account, or a debit card.

      Connect with an Inmate